Tag: lucky peach

My Favorite Veg-Based Cookbooks

With Veganuary coming to a close and my covert announcement in Alicia Kennedy’s newsletter on recipe writing and ingredient sourcing on the kinds of recipes I will be sharing here, I thought now was as good a time as any to walk you through some of my favorite vegan and vegetarian cookbooks.

To be clear, I’m not vegan or vegetarian because limiting my eating options causes problems for me, but I do eat a mostly vegan and vegetarian diet and try to shop as animal, human and planet friendly as possible.

I promise these 13 vegan and vegetarian cookbooks will keep you as inspired as I am about centering vegetables on your plate.

Vegetable Kingdom – Bryant Terry

Bryant Terry is a star in his own right in (vegan) cooking and after reading Vegetable Kingdom: The Abundant World of Vegan Recipes, I can see why. I can’t recall a best of 2020 cookbook list without it, so I had to have it.

With Bryant’s classical training at first glance this book can come across as a bit ‘cheffy’. Once you realise virtually each recipe is a menu in and of itself, and that you can take each individual component to make your own combinations or just cook one of them at a time, it all becomes a lot less intimidating so all you’re left with is inspiration.

I’ve already made the fantastic charred leak and mushroom toast with a pinenut puree from Vegetable Kingdom but the taro root cakes and cornmeal-fried oyster mushroom po’boy are also high on my hitlist along with all the other purees mentioned in the book. Or Vegetable Kingdom here if you’re in the US, or here if you’re in the UK.

Rosa’s Thai Café: The Vegetarian Cookbook – Siaphin Moore

My brother took me to Rosa’s Thai Café in London’s East End (our old haunt) years ago and I distinctly recall it blowing my mind. Before I’d only had heavy Thai ‘curries’ but Rosa’s showed how bright and refreshing Thai cooking can be. So when I spotted this book and saw one of my favorite photography and styling teams had worked on it I had to get it.

There are quite a number of reasons to love this book. The photography by Louise Hagger and styling by Alexander Breeze is stellar, for one. The recipes are mostly vegan and extremely diverse in scope. But above all, Saiphin Moore has embellished each recipes in Rosa’s Thai Café: The Vegetarian Cookbook with her rich personal history of eating experiences, recipe sources and more. This book gives you a real feel for all the regional Thai cuisines and Saiphin’s past growing up and living in various parts of Asia and now the UK.

All the recipes, including this gaeng penang tua lima (vegan butterbean panang) are surprisingly easy to make, which is just icing on the cake to me. Order Rosa’s Thai Café: The Vegetarian here if you are in the UK.

Jackfruit & Blue Ginger – Sasha Gill

If you’re looking for a broader vegan Asian tome, Sashi Gill is your woman. In Jackfruit & Blue Ginger: Asian Favorites Made Vegan Sasha shares well-beloved classic Asian dishes from India, Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia, China and Japan, made vegan, as well as some basic techniques to veganize recipes of your own accord.

Chapters are organised by region, which makes it easy to find something to suit your mood or come up with a cohesive vegan menu for a dinner party.

One thing in particular that I love about this book is that it also contains sweets or ‘desserts’ from each region (most Asian cuisines don’t work with desserts, but have sweets throughout the day instead). The vegan Hong Kong ‘egg’ tarts made with silken tofu in particular are amazing and a recipe I’ve made and fed to others again and again, it also formed the foundation for my vegan dark and stormy crème brûlee. Order Jackfruit & Blue Ginger here if you’re in the UK or here if you are in the US (it appeared under another title).

Greenfeast – Nigel Slater

As a voracious reader I prefer reading that challenges and discomforts me. But there are times when something more soothing is required. As a young one I found this comfort in Kurt Vonnegut, because he seemed as miffed by the ways of the world as I was (and still am).

Now that I’m older I cannot think of a single more soothing voice than Nigel Slater‘s. One of my favorite recipes of his is called an earthy meal in a bowl type soup, a title that describes his writing to a tee. When you read Nigel you know you are going to be alright.

Greenfeast comes in two parts: Spring, Summer and Autumn, Winter. These books will help you cook with the seasons and as Nigel states, are intended more to inspire than to be very exacting with. They are my go to when I’ve bought a vegetable but no longer know what to do with it. I just pull them out and browse, good things surely coming my way. Greenfeast is a bit cream and cheese heavy and very classical European in scope, which makes it a great place to start for anyone only just venturing into more veg-based eating straight from plates full of meat.

Order Spring, Summer here if you are in the US and here if you are in the UK. Order Autumn, Winter here if you are in the US or here if you are in the UK.

Vegan with Bite – Shannon Martinez

I got to know Shannon over some late night/ early morning transnational DMing (don’t be gross) and knew I had to get one of her books immediately. Lucky for me Vegan with Bite had just come out.

Shannon isn’t vegan but her restaurant is vegan and so are the recipes she shares because *gesticulates at planet*.

My favorite thing about this book is that ingredients aren’t prefaced with ‘vegan’ (vegan butter, vegan milk, etc). It’s a vegan cookbook so when Shannon says butter she obviously means vegan butter and when she says milk she obviously means non-dairy milk. That’s just a level of duh I’m really into. She also gives you some very useful pointers as to what to look out for when buying ready-made products because so many products that sound like they may have meat in them no longer do (chicken stock cubes, for one, rarely contain chicken – at least in Australia).

One of the chapters is called Minimum Effort, Maximum Results and another has the byline Zero Waste, Maximum Taste and these are pretty much the rules I cook by so you can see why I have to recommend it. Order here in the US or here in the UK.

Joe Yonan – Cool Beans

I bought one of Joe Yonan‘s other books years ago, when he still included meat. He’s since committed to sharing meat free recipes only.

With Cool Beans, the title kind of speaks for itself. It made me realise beans are a great staple that I could be eating more of without it being a sad ‘tin of beans’ sort of affair. Cool Beans includes a whole bunch of classics (paella! hummus!) from the world over as well as some of Yonan’s own concoctions all with a bean-centric focus. He even includes some tips on how to avoid the notorious musical side effects of beans: farts. Apparently it helps if you cook them well, and this is just the book that’ll help you do it. Order here in the US or here in the UK.

Lagusta Yearwood – Sweet+Salty

I got Salty+Sweet: The Art of Vegan Chocolates, Truffles, Caramels and More by Lagusta Yearwood because Alicia Kennedy recommended it. In it, her famous Lagusta’s Luscious truffles and caramels feature prominently. If you’re good at coming up with funky flavors and adjusting recipes to your own needs (it me) this may feel a bit one-note when you first start reading it. I can come up with funky truffles perfectly fine on my own, thank you very much.

That said, Lagusta gives such great and in-depth information in the perils of shopping and producing ethically (sugar and cacao are a nightmare) and things get a little bit more exciting (for me at least) on the caramel end of things, which is why I’ve decided to include this here. I was talking about uncomfortable reading earlier: this book will make you uncomfortable. But then you get to make better decisions and make vegan chocolate truffles in exciting flavors (or come up with your own, I’ve got kimchi truffles on my mind for one), so it’s all good. Order at Bookshop.org in the US or in the UK.

Vegan Soul Food – Jason Tjon Affo

This is an honorable mention because Vegan Soul Food by Jason Tjon Affo isn’t actually available in English (yet). But it’s a beautiful vegan cookbook full of colorful photography ánd food, mostly inspired by Jason’s Surinamese roots. Which makes this an incredibly diverse cookbook, because Suriname contains multitudes.

My recipe for vegan kue lapis flavored monkey bread was based on Jason’s vegan monkey bread recipe from Vegan Soul Food, so there you go.

Nosh – Esther Erwteman

Nosh: Mijn Vegetarische Joodse Keuken (My Vegetarian Jewish Kitchen) is a lovely and beautiful book by Esther Erwteman who runs Amsterdam-based deli, cooking school and eatery (the former two when there’s no Covid going around) Esther’s Cookery. This is another honorable mention because it’s only available in Dutch right now.

In Nosh Esther interweaves her personal history with her Jewish faith, explaining why certain dishes are prepared and eaten at certain times as well as explaining how certain less obvious choices made it into her repertoire. If you live in Amsterdam be sure to help yourself and help Esther by visiting her shop and getting some good nosh, or if you’re not be sure to order some of her prime goodies in Esther’s Cookery webshop. I’ve gotten a really nice aubergine grill and some lovely harissa’s from her and she also offers workshops online.

Zaitoun – Yasmin Khan

Another honorable mention because strictly speaking Yasmin Khan‘s Zaitoun: Recipes and Stories from the Palestinian Kitchen is neither vegan nor vegetarian. That said, only 13 recipes in this book contain meat. These recipes can easily ignored in favor of all the veg based dishes in this book. The unique insights Zaitoun offers into the Palestinian kitchen and reality are another element of this book that cannot be ignored which is why I had to include it.

I’ve made the falafel and fennel pickle from this book. Both were simple and delicious, so if you’re into Mediterranean and Middle Eastern flavors with a bit of back story this book is for you. Order in the US or in the UK.

Ed Smith – On The Side

I found On The Side in the discount isle at the American Book Center in The Hague. Intrigued by a book consisting of just sides, I bought it. This book has been my most trustworthy companion ever since. I don’t know why there aren’t more books on sides, though this might be the only one you’ll ever need.

Every recipe includes tips on what to combine them with or how to combine them with other recipes from the book to make a full meal. Furthermore there are not one but three (THREE!) indexes. You can browse based on your main protein, based on what veg you want to use or based on how much time you have. As such it served for the inspiration of the way I’ve set up my chapters and the additional vegan and vegetarian index for my book Nomnomnom.

I previously shared a peppercorn and lime rice recipe from On The Side. Order On the Side at Bookshop.org in the UK.

Lucky Peach Presents Power Vegetables

Sadly as it turns out Lucky Peach was not a happy place. And now as I read some of the older copies, I can tell it was all a lot more bro dudey than I can stomach (I’ll confess I was more bro dudey when I first read them too). Still, when I got my hands on my first Lucky Peach I fell in love hard because up until that point I didn’t know food writing like this existed.

Fast forward whatever years later and all I’m missing is #1. While the issues of the magazine are hard to get a hold of, most of the books are easy to find and out of all of them I think Lucky Peach presents Power Vegetables might give you the most bang for your buck. The photography is amazing and the recipes are all accessible and easy to follow, with LOADS of flavor. Vegan too.

In general I find vegetarian cookbooks lean a little too heavily on cheese (and I love cheese, just not for every meal) while vegan cookbooks are just diet books in disguise. Power Veg is just a good old cookbook that leaves you feeling hungry and ready to wield some veg.

You can find some recipes from Lucky Peach presents Power Vegetables here.

That’s my roundup for vegan and vegetarian cookbooks, I hope the scope is wide enough to have something in the list for you. Be sure to order from your local bookstore!

Zoek je deze kookboekentips in het Nederlands? Ga dan naar vettesletten.nl voor 13 van mijn favoriete vegan- en vegakookboeken.

Lucky Peach’s Shroom Mapo Tofu

Lucky Peach presents Power Vegetables comes in particularly handy during Veganuary, though a lot of the recipes are actually vegetarian.

A bookshelf filled with cookbooks and a copy of Power Vegetables shown in front.

Sichuan pepper love

One of my other favorite ingredients is Sichuan pepper. It’s just a floral spicy bundle of joy. This vegan rendition used shiitake mushrooms, which bring a lot of additional ooooooh-mami to the table. Sheer perfection if you’re into funky food.

Vegan check

Be sure to check the ingredients of the doubanjiang, black bean and chili crisp sauce. Sometimes these contain animal products.

What do I eat with vegan mushroom mapo tofu?

I like to have mine with plain white rice and some stir fried baby bok choy, broccoli or just same plain old cucumber.

Do more with vegan mushroom mapo tofu

You can keep leftovers in the fridge for a couple of days, in the freezer for a couple of months and wrap them in wonton skins to make some bangin’ ass gyozo.

I used the spice mix to come up with my own hot-tingle mapo hot sauce, get the recipe here.

A small white enamel bowl with a blue rim, filled with vegan mushroom mapo tofu on a grey laminate background surrounded by sichuan peppercorns, spring onions, shiitake mushrooms and the book Lucky Peach presents Power Vegetables

Lucky Peach Vegan Mushroom Mapo Tofu

Dorothy Porker
This vegan mapo tofu made with shiitake mushrooms is a must-have for anyone that likes Sichuan food or umami, vegan or not.
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Soaking time 30 mins
Course Dinner, Main course
Cuisine Chinese, Sichuan
Servings 4

Equipment

  • Bowl
  • Small plate
  • Food processor
  • Large pot
  • Strainer
  • Frying pan or wok
  • Kitchen towel

Ingredients
  

  • 4.5 oz - 125 g dried shiitake mushrooms see instructions
  • 9 oz - 250 g fresh shiitake mushrooms
  • 12 oz - 350 g silken tofu cut into cubes - firm tofu works but is less nice for mapo tofu
  • salt
  • 2 t - 10 g corn starch
  • 1/4 c - 60 ml lukewarm water
  • 2 T - 30 ml sunflower oil
  • 1 leek sliced into thin strips
  • 4 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 2 T - 30 g grated ginger
  • 4 T - 60 g doubanjiang chili bean sauce
  • 2 T - 30 g black bean sauce
  • 1 T - 15 g chili crisp
  • 2 T - 30 g Sichuan peppercorns black seeds and woody stems removed
  • 1 T - 15 g gochugaru Korean chili flakes

Instructions
 

Soak the dried mushrooms

  • Remove the stems from 4.5 oz - 125 g dried mushrooms and leave them to soak in water for at least 30 minutes. To submerge them it helps to place a small plate on top.
  • Drain and set the liquid aside.
  • Now use a food processor to chop the dried shiitakes together with 9 oz - 250 g of fresh shiitakes to a rough pulp.

Poach the silken tofu

  • If you are using firm tofu you can skip this step and press the tofu for 30 minutes with a heavy object instead. But silken tofu really gives the best result for mapo tofu imho.
  • Cut the silken tofu into 1 inch - 1.5 cm cubes.
  • Bring water to a boil in a large pot and poach 12 oz - 350 g of silken tofu for 3 minutes or so. Strain, salt lightly and set aside.

Make vegan mushroom mapo tofu

  • Mix together 2 t - 10 g of corn starch with 1/4 c - 60 ml of water to create a slushy paste.
  • Now get all your other ingredients together alongside the mushroom pulp, poached silken tofu and corn paste so you have your mis-en-place ready and are good to go.
  • Heat 2 T - 30 ml of sunflower oil in a large frying pan or a wok. Add the shiitake mushroom pulp and spread it out in an even layer, folding it every few minutes or so until any remaining liquids have evaporated and the shiitake are starting to brown. This should take 5 minutes or so.
  • Now add 1 leek sliced into thick strips, 4 cloves of finely chopped garlic and 1 T - 15 g of grated ginger and mix this in with the mushrooms for another 2 minutes or so until fragrant. Remove the mushroom and leek mixture from the pan and give the pan a quick wipe with a kitchen towel before returning it to the heat.
  • Add 2 T - 30 g of Sichuan peppercorns, 4 T - 60 g of doubjiang, 2 T - 30 g of black bean and 1 T - 15 g of chili crisp sauce to the pan with 1 T - 15 gr of gochugaru and stir until the oils start to separate from the sauce, before adding the mushroom mixture back in. This should take 2 minutes or so. Now gently stir in the soft tofu and finally add the corn starch slush to create that mapo tofu glaze.
  • Now gently fold in the poached silken tofu cubes and finally add the corn starch slush, allowing the liquids to thicken ever so slightly before serving.

Notes

Mushroom mapo tofu freezes okay though the tofu becomes a bit of an acquired texture. It's the perfect filling for gyozo too.
Mushroom mapo tofu will keep in the fridge for up to 3 days and in the freezer for up to 3 months and can be reheated by allowing it to thaw and then briefly frying it back up in a greased frying pan.
Keyword chinese recipe, easy vegan, lucky peach, mapo tofu, mushrooms, sichaun food, sichuan, sichuan recipe

Zoek je dit recept in het Nederlands? Ga dan naar VetteSletten.nl voor vegan mapo tofu van paddestoelen.

Lucky Peach’s Miso-amped Hummus

After the pumpkin, chocolate and other hummus nightmares of late I understand that hummus with miso sounds very worrying indeed.

Blame Lucky Peach presents Power Vegetables

Thankfully the idea to add miso to hummus doesn’t come from me, but from Lucky Peach presents Power Vegetables. And the miso in this recipe isn’t a cover-up to disguise the flavor of hummus, but rather a means to enhance it in all it’s hummussy goodness.

A bookshelf filled with cookbooks and a copy of Power Vegetables shown in front.

Gooey fluffy magic hummus tricks

I had words with this recipe the first time I made it. My chickpeas would barely budge when I tried to blend them in my food processor. They were absolute dicks. Thankfully someone told me I should use some of the cooking liquids of the chickpeas to help smooth their transition into hummusy goodness.

Then I found my hummus to be quite… firm and Play-Dough like once it had cooled down. I don’t recall where I read this a few weeks later, but a couple of ice cubes really help turn your hummus into the best gooey fluffy magic ever.

A bowl of miso amped hummus surrounded by its ingredients and some Turkish bread

Varations and what to have miso-amped hummus with

I have updated the recipe below to add instructions on how to make a garlicky hummus dip, or just a chickpea-garlic spread if you want to be proper about calling hummus hummus and other things made with chickpeas and other ingredients something else.

I like to top mine with za’atar or sumac for some extra oomph.

You can eat the dip with bread or however else you like or use it to make:

A bowl of miso amped hummus surrounded by its ingredients

Miso-amped hummus from Lucky Peach presents Power Vegetables

Dorothy Porker
This very inauthentic hummus is based on a recipe from Lucky Peach's Power Vegetables, improved over time with tips from internet randos and magazines.
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 1 hr
Overnight soak 8 hrs
Course Appetizer, Breakfast, Brunch, Dinner, Lunch, Party snack, Snack
Cuisine Middle Eastern, Vegan, Vegetarian

Equipment

  • Large pot, for soaking and cooking
  • Ladle
  • Sieve
  • Small bowl
  • Kitchen towel
  • Food processor
  • Oven, if making garlic and chickpea spread, AND
  • Oven proof dish

Ingredients
  

  • 1 c - 200 gr dried chickpeas soaked overnight, weight is pre-soak
  • 1 t - 5 gr baking soda
  • 1/4 c - 60 ml olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic smashed and peeled
  • 3/4 c - 175 ml chickpea cooking liquid see instructions
  • 1/4 c - 60 ml lemon juice fresh is best
  • 1 t - 5 gr salt
  • pinch ground cumin
  • 1/2 c - 120 ml tahin
  • 1 T - 15 gr miso white is best, but red works too
  • 3 ice cubes

For the chickpea and garlic spread

  • all of the above +
  • 3 heads garlic separated into skin-on cloves
  • olive oil
  • salt

Instructions
 

  • Drain 1 c - 200 gr soaked chickpeas, place them on a kitchen towel and dry them off gently.
  • Move the chickpeas to a large pot, I used the same one I soak them in overnight, with 1 tsp - 5 gr of baking soda and cook on a low heat while stirring vigorously for 2 to 3 minutes or so.
  • Cover the chickpeas until they are submerged in about 1" of cold water and bring to a boil.
  • Leave to simmer until they are soft. This can take 30-60 minutes, depending on the quality and age of your chickpeas. Use a ladle to remove any foam or chickpea skins that come bubbling to the surface. Add water if your chickpeas appear to be drying out, but haven't softened yet.
  • Drain the chickpeas, making sure you hang on to the cooking liquid. You'll need it for the next step.
  • Place the chickpeas, 1/4 c - 60 ml olive oil and 1 clove of garlic into a food processor along with a first scoop of the cooking liquid. Blitz for 2 minutes. Add more of the liquid if your food processor starts to struggle.
  • Finally add 1/4 c - 60 ml of lemon juice, 1 t - 5 gr salt, 1 pinch of cumin, 1/2 c - 270 gr of tahini, 1 T - 15 gr of miso and 3 ice cubes (and the roast garlic if you're making chickpea and garlic spread) and blend again for another 2 minutes until well combined and fluffy. If your food processor is struggling again use a wooden spoon to beat the ingredients together until the last of the ice cubes as dissolved completely.
  • Your hummus is now done. Lucky Peach prefers it warm, but I quite enjoy it cold as well

To make chickpea and garlic spread

  • First, take a moment to resist the urge to call this garlic-hummus. Hummus is made with chickpeas only. Add anything else and it's no longer hummus. We're calling this a spread. S P R E A D.
  • Preheat an oven to 320° F/ 160° C.
  • Spread the individual unpeeled garlic cloves from 3 bulbs of garlic in an even layer in an oven proof dish. Coat evenly in olive oil and salt generously.
  • Roast the garlic cloves until they have gone soft and squishy but are not burned, in my oven this takes about 30-45 minutes.
  • Peel or smoosh the garlic gunk out of its skin.
  • Blitz the roast garlic cloves into the hummus that will no longer be a hummus alongside the other ingredients mentioned in step 7.

Notes

This hummus will keep in the fridge in a closed container for 2 to 3 days. 
Keyword chickpeas, dips, hummus, humus, lucky peach, miso, spreads

Zoek je dit recept in het Nederlands? Ga dan naar VetteSletten.nl voor met miso opgevoerde hummus.

Christina Tosi’s Cherry Cola Cake

I was a huge fan of Lucky Peach, the literary food mag founded by Dave Chang and Peter Meehan, and am still upset it’s gone. Any time I’m in a bookstore I’ll literally stare at the food magazines and hope it’s there.

When they folded I back-ordered all the issues and books I could find, and a friend donated some of the early issues she had. I’ve received another issue via Instagram, and then one more via eBay. So now I am only missing issue 1.

The cover of the suburbs issue from Lucky Peach

Like Playboy for food lovers

Mind you, for all those years reading and loving LP I barely cooked any recipes from it. Not unlike Playboy I mainly read LP for the articles. The recipes just seemed too… hard? But now that it’s gone and I can’t procrastinate by reading more, I’m slowly getting into the swing of things.

Not as hard as you think

First up: Christina Tosi’s cherry cola Bundt cake, from the suburbs issue (#23). A recipe that I think it also a part of her new book, All About Cake. This cake is a lot easier than the long list of ingredients would have you believe. I kind of fucked up the glaze but since I’m not much of a baker to begin with, so having this cake turn out a moist treat was an achievement enough on its own.

Unnaturally delicious

Note that people who consider themselves fancy might find this cake a bit off putting as there is nothing natural about cherry cola. Strangely the glaze tasted faintly of stroop susu. An Indonesian rose flavored syrup I adore. So for me it’s definite keeper.

A cherry cola Bundt cake surrounded by slices of cake, a magazine, a pink butter dish and an empty can of cherry cola

Christina Tosi's cherry cola cake

Dorothy Porker
Delicious moist zingy Bundt cake, based on a recipe by Christina Tosi for Lucky Peach. Now also available in her All About Cake book.
Prep Time 1 hr
Cook Time 1 hr
Course Dessert, Party snack, Treat
Cuisine American
Servings 10

Equipment

  • Microwave
  • Microwavable bowl x 2
  • Blender
  • Oven
  • Mixing bowl x 3
  • Whisk
  • Bundt cake shape (Ø 10"/ 26 cm)
  • Wire rack
  • Baking sheet
  • Parchment or other lining

Ingredients
  

For the cherry puree, you can also use store bought if you can find it

  • 1/4 c+ 2 T - 115 gr sugar
  • pinch salt
  • 1/4 c - 60 ml water
  • 15 oz - 450 gr cherries pitted, fresh or frozen both work
  • 1 T - 15ml lemon juice

To prepare your cake pan

  • melted butter for coating the cake pan
  • flour for dusting the cake pan

Wet cake ingredients

  • 16 T - 230 gr unsalted butter melted
  • 2/3 c+1 T - 150 gr cherry cola
  • 2/3 c - 150 gr cherry puree store bought is also fine
  • 1/2 c - 100 gr neutral oil
  • 2 T - 30 gr molasses I use Dutch stroop as molasses is hard to find here
  • 2 1/2 t - 10 gr vanilla extract
  • 2 1/2 t - 10 gr cola extract
  • 5 large eggs
  • 2 large egg yolks

Dry cake ingredients

  • 2 1/4 c - 450 gr sugar
  • 1/3 c+2 T - 100 gr light brown sugar
  • 3 1/2 c - 450 gr cake flour see instructions below if you can't find this
  • 2 t - 8 gr baking powder
  • 2 t - 8 gr salt

For the glaze

  • 2.1 oz - 60 gr cream cheese
  • 2 T - 30 gr butter
  • 1 1/2 c - 180 gr powdered sugar
  • 2 T - 30 gr cherry cola
  • 1/2 t - 2 g cola extract
  • 1/4 t - 1 g vanilla extract
  • 1/8 t - 0.5 gr salt
  • red food coloring optional

Instructions
 

Make the cherry puree, if not using store-bought

  • You can make this up to a week ahead of time and keep it in an airtight container in the fridge.
  • Combine 1/4 c + 2 tbsp - 115 gr of sugar, a pinch of salt and 1/4 c - 60 ml of water in a microwave proof bowl and microwave at full power for about 30 seconds.
  • Remove from the microwave stir until all the sugar and salt has dissolved.
  • Pour the mixture into a blender, adding 15 oz - 450 grams of cherries and 1 T - 15 ml of lemon juice before blending until smooth. Leave to cool.

Make the cake

  • If you cannot find American cake flour, you can make your own by blending together 1 c - 125 grams of plain flour with 1 T - 15 grams of corn flour. For this recipe you will need to make 4 batches of cake flour and you’ll be left with a little extra for another project.
  • To make the cake preheat your oven at 180° C/ 360° F. Lightly coat the inside of your Bundt pan with melted butter and a light dusting of flour.
  • In a bowl combine 16 T - 230 gr of melted butter, 2/3 c + 1 T- 150 gr of cherry cola, 2/3 c - 150 gr of cherry puree, 1/2 c - 100 gr of neutral oil, 2 T - 30 gr of molasses, 2 1/2 t - 10 gr of cola and vanilla extracts each, 5 large eggs and 2 yolks and whisk until smooth.
  • In another bowl rub together 3 1/2 c - 450 gr of sugar with 1/3 c + 2 tbsp - 100 gr of light brown sugar until there are no more lumps. Add 3 1/2 c - 450 gr of cake flour, 2 t - 8 gr of baking powder and salt each and stir to combine.
  • Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and whisk until smooth.
  • Pour the batter into the cake pan and bake until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean. This should take about 1 hour. Place the cake on a wire rack and leave to cool for 5 minutes before turning the cake over, removing the Bundt pan and allowing to cool completely.

Make the glaze

  • Do NOT start this process until your cake is fully cooled.
  • Combine 2.1 oz - 60 gr of cream cheese with 2 T - 30 gr of butter in a microwave proof bowl and heat together in the microwave for about 30 seconds.
  • Once removed from the microwave stir together until smooth.
  • Move the cream cheese/ butter mixture to a larger bowl and whisk in 1 1/2 c - 180 gr powdered sugar, 2 T - 30 gr cherry cola, 1/2 T - 2 gr cola extract, 1/4 t - 1 gr vanilla extract, 1/4 t - 0.5 gr salt and 1 or 2 drops of red food coloring (if using).

Combine powers

  • Place your completely cooled cake on a lined baking sheet with the rack and drizzle over the glaze.
  • There are different theories on how to properly glaze a Bundt cake. Some people think you should only let it drizzle along the crevices, others like a full coat. I’m a glutton of course but you do you.

Notes

This cake should keep in a closed container in the fridge for 3-5 days.
Keyword american cakes, cherry cola, christina tosi, fish cakes, lucky peach, milk bar, milkbar

Zoek je dit recept in het Nederlands? Ga dan naar VetteSletten.nl voor Christina Tosi’s cherry cola Bundt cake.

Butternut Squash with Chipotle Crema

I should have googled what piquillos were before I made this. Because I ended up making this butternut squash piquillo crema recipe from Lucky Peach presents Power Vegetables with a tin of chipotles in adobo instead.

What’s the difference between piquillos and chipotles in adobo?

Everything basically Piquillos and chipotle in adobo are very much not the same thing. At all.

The latter is mad spicy, the former? Not so much. Still it’s one of my favorite delicious mistakes. Since you can’t get piquillos as easily here, though I reckon sweet red peppers might do. Still, I’ve found no other purpose for chipotle in adobo that I like as much as this.

That’s great but how do I eat this butternut squash?

I tend to eat this vegetarian butternut squash with chipotle crema with a good helping of pasta, though I’d imagine a warm bowl of rice will also do nicely.

I save the remainder of the garlic oil to roast potatoes, veggies, meats and fried eggs. Garlic all the things basically.

The book suggests you can have this as a side (I’m not sure with what though, maybe a good medium-rare steak or some expertly roast chicken) or as I have described above, with some pasta or rice as a comforting main. Even if you use the wrong sort of chili.

A bowl of roast butternut squash with chipotle crema surrounded by its main ingredients as well as a towel, grated cheese and some dried linguine

Butternut Squash with Chipotle Crema

Dorothy Porker
Vegetarian recipe for butternut squash and chipotle crema inspired by fucking up a recipe from Lucky Peach presents Power Vegetables.
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Course Dinner, Main course, Side dish
Cuisine Mexican
Servings 2

Equipment

  • Oven
  • Small saucepan
  • Microwave proof bowl or cup
  • Large skillet or frying pan
  • Oven tray and parchment or an ovenproof dish
  • Blender

Ingredients
  

  • 4 cloves garlic Peeled
  • 2 c - 500 ml olive oil roughly, see recipe
  • 1 c - 250 ml creme fraîche
  • 1/4 c - 20 gr chipotle en adobo basically one chipotle with some adobo
  • 1 t - 5 gr salt
  • 1/2 butternut squash peeled and cubed
  • 1 c - 80 gr Parmesan grated
  • 1/4 c - 20 gr coriander roughly chopped

Instructions
 

  • Preheat your oven to 200° C/ 400° F.
  • Confit 4 cloves of peeled garlic by placing them in a small saucepan and covering it in olive oil until it starts to float. Place it on a low heat, bring to a simmer and then turn down the heat as low as possible, leaving it for 20 minutes.
  • Toss the cubes of half a butternut squash in a the garlic oil. You want to lightly coat the cubes, salt and then roast them in an even layer for about 30 minutes on a baking tray lined with parchment or in an ovenproof dish. Toss halfway through.
  • Warm 1/4 c - 250 ml of creme fraîche in a microwave proof bowl in the microwave at low for 1 minute. Pour into a blender with 1/4 c - 20 gr of chipotle en adobo, 4 cloves of confit garlic and 1 tsp - 5 gr of salt and blend until smooth.
  • Pour the crema into a large skillet set over a low heat, add the roasted squash and toss to combine. Stir in 1/2 c - 40 gr of cheese until melted. Serve topped with the remainder of the cheese and the cilantro.

Notes

Store any leftover garlic oil in an airtight container and use to roast potatoes, veggies, meats, fried eggs, whatever tickles your pickle. It will keep for 2-3 weeks in the fridge. 
Keyword chipotle en adobo, lucky peach, Mexican food, pasta sauce, peter meehan, power vegetables, side dish, side dishes

Zoek je dit recept in het Nederlands? Surf dan naar VetteSletten.nl voor flespompoen met chipotle crème.